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Speech – The Missing Criterion

By on jan 19, 2015 in English, Speeches | 0 comments

This speech was written for the Global Climate Ambassadors at the transition of the European Green Capital Award from Copenhagen to Bristol on December 8, 2014. It was delivered by four separate children – one from each city. Their names are Aliyah Bergström (Malmö), Jonas Ilmari Balsby (Brussels), Siw Rønne Appel  (Copenhagen) and James Gibson (Bristol). You can also read it on their website.    The Missing Criterion The part from Malmö – Aliyah Bergström We are children from Malmo and right next door we are holding the Children’s Climate Summit. Because we can see that something is missing. At the United Nations Earth Summit, 12 year old Severn Suzuki walked up on the stage in Rio de Janeiro and made the leaders of the world listen. Last week she turned 35. She is now married and has two kids. A generation has come and gone, but what has changed? The climate has...

Speech – Climate Change Is Now

By on nov 4, 2014 in English, Speeches | 0 comments

I wrote this speech for the Global Climate Ambassadors to be delivered at the launch of the 5 th IPCC assessment report in Copenhagen on October 27, 2014. It was delivered at City Hall in front of the Danish Climate Minister, The Lord Mayor of Copenhagen and the entire IPCC team by three kids: Nana Haislund Hansen, Markus Gerner Van Deurs and Emma Brag  – and here is the report they wrote about ‘Engaging the Next Genereation‘. Here is the video:   Climate Change Is Now!   We are children. We are from Ghana, Belgium, Nigeria, Sweden, India, Zambia and right here in Denmark. We are the Global Climate Ambassadors and we want to talk to you about climate change. Climate change is here right now – in the past it was a question about our future. No More. Climate change is now. We see it, we hear it and we talk about it. We worry about our future. In India children...

Behind the Weather Talk

By on maj 25, 2014 in English, The making of | 0 comments

This is a storify about the reception of one speech – Talking about the Weather. It was given by  Danish Minister for Climate, Energy and Building, Rasmus Helveg Petersen at IPCC and WMO’s Workshop on Communicating Climate, Paris, France, April 2, 2014.   [View the story “After the Weather Talk” on Storify]

Speech – Talking About the Weather

By on apr 19, 2014 in English, Speeches | 0 comments

This speech was written for Danish Minister for Climate, Energy and Building, Rasmus Helveg Petersen to be delivered at IPCC and WMO’s Workshop on Communicating Climate, Paris, France, April 2, 2014. You can also read about the reception of the speech on social media afterwards here – Behind the Weather Talk.    Talking about the weather Thank you for having me. It is truly a pleasure to be here, a pleasure I have been looking forward to for a long time. After all, it is not every day that you get to talk back to the weather reporter. This time you are the ones in the seat listening and I am the one talking. But we are here for a serious reason. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has just released a report about the effects of climate change, climate adaptation and vulnerability. Soon they will release a report about mitigating climate change. That is worth...

Danish climate speech wins international award

By on apr 10, 2014 in English, The making of | 0 comments

Now here is a blog post I never thought I should write… I just won two Cicero Speechwriting Awards 2014 in the categories Government and Environment/Energy/Sustainability… just: wow… I am the first Danish speechwriter ever to win any. Climate Change and the Story of Sarah I wrote the speech Climate Change and the Story of Sarah for former Danish Minister for Climate, Energy and Building (now Foreign Affairs), Martin Lidegaard. The speech is written for an international conference on reproductive health May 23, 2013 in Copenhagen. That means that the audience consists of doctors and medical scientists. It also means that the Ministry does not have an office or a department expert who knows about reproductive health. It is not our normal area of expertice. That is why I was given rather free hand to structure an argument according to the ministers wishes. And to use...